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Data Visualization 2 (Map of All Publishing Cities)

Data Visualization 2 (Map of All Publishing Cities)

I used Google Fusion map to reveal all the publishing cities listed in the END database. I was surprised to find that it included cities out farther west in the United States, considering that it seems highly unlikely that there would be cities that far out west during this time period. This is mostly likely due to the fact that many cities in the U.S are named after cities in England and other countries.

Data Visualization 1 (Line Graph of Top 6 Publishing Cities)

Data Visualization 1 (Line Graph of Top 6 Publishing Cities)

I had experimented with different forms of data manipulation, and I ultimately chose to use relatively simple techniques or my data visualizations. My two data visualizations provide a presentation of publishing cities found in the END database and showcases the rise and decline of the top six publishing cities throughout this time period. One is in the form of a line graph and the other is in the form of a map.

This Google Fusion Tables line graph reveals that London had, for the most part, published the most books compared to the other top publishing cities during this time period. London experienced its peak in the 1810s and immediately plummeted by the 1820s. Of the American cities, Philadelphia was, for the most part, consistently in the lead in comparison to New York and Boston.

Summer project map

Summer project map

I found this map of Edinburgh in 1825 that has been geocoded. I plan to see if I can discover the locations of some publishers and printers in Edinburgh during that time period. If I can, I will be using the exact, or as close as I can get, locations of these places to map them using StoryMaps and ArcGIS software. In doing this, I can get a clearer idea of who was in this industry and determine whether or not proximity had an effect on the printing industry and the partnerships between publishers and printers. I will also be able to see if all of these locations are in a certain area of the city. All of this will be overlayed onto a map of present-day Edinburgh so viewers will have a clearer picture of where this all took place.

END t-shirt concept

END t-shirt concept

"END 2016: Putting the 'cat' in cataloging."

Illustration: Gripe-men-all, arch-duke of the furr'd law-cats, from Rabelais's works.

Bob Lovelace

Bob Lovelace

What can it be, Bob?

Love,
Yumi and Kat

Untitled

Images of hands in google books make the human labor that goes into their production visible, working against the fetishization of the image. Images like this one can be read as texts about the underpaid and undervalued labor, carried out largely by people of color, that keeps silicon valley and higher ed functioning.

Source: http://theartofgooglebooks.tumblr.com/post/140144630800/employees-hand-from-p-259-of-the-souls-of

What do we digitize? Not novels...

What do we digitize? Not novels...

I spent a lot of time collecting full texts from the 1760s with genre terms in the title as part of my project. The results are pictured in the graphs above. I calculated the percent of texts based on the list of all 1760s titles we've compiled (one of them on the initial edition-specific list and the other two on a later de-duplicated version of that list) and the (high quality) full text files I found. I double counted works that included multiple genre terms in their titles.
These graphs and the work they are based on privilege genre keywords, although most researchers and institutions digitizing files aren't usually thinking about genre when they choose what texts to work on. Genre, however, overlaps with many of the things that do motivate digitization choices - namely texts that are considered important or "good" enough to preserve. Many of my texts come from ECCO TCP, and I couldn't find a statement about their methodology (how and why they choose the texts they choose for digitization), but regardless of what that methodology is, unless it is random, it is probably influenced by what we think is "worth" preserving.
The results in this bar graph give an idea of how genre plays into this - 1760s "novels," or works that at the time were willing to claim that label, are comparatively underrepresented in digitization efforts.
What we think is good or important work, based on what we digitize, is not a novel in the 1760s. And we know that in the 1760s, "novel" was not yet an established and respectable genre. Johnson’s 1775 dictionary defines novel with the following short phrase: “A small tale, generally of love.” He diminishes the novel - it is literally small. In the explanatory quotes below (not sure if they are in the dictionary or added to the online version, but they are contemporary), the novel is qualified with “trifling” and as the possession of a coxcomb. Clearly, novel is not high art in 1755, and probably has not climbed up to that status in the five years that lead up to 1760.
Authors who chose the label novel, then, were not claiming the status of high art. Their texts were trying to achieve something else - perhaps entertainment value and commercial success. But the lack of digitized 1760s novels also tells us something about where literary research tends to look - towards what was, seemingly both then and now, considered “good” literature. Popular culture is left to the historians looking at newspaper clippings, and the underbelly of literary history is overlooked. What makes this oversight particularly interesting is the respect attributed to the term novel today. To some extent, that respect is accompanied by investment in the history of the novel, evident in something like the possibility of Gaby’s research on rise/history of the novel type classes. But that has still not translated into the creation of an accessible archive of low-brow novels.
Part of what digital humanities seems to be looking at, based on some of the things we’ve read, is the broader field of literature and literary history technology allows us to look at. But that is hard to do when the data we have access to is still dictated by the research biases that have defined much of literary scholarship.
Unfortunately, because this 2% of 1760s novels I found full texts for is only one book, I will not be using the novel category going forward with my project, and so I will continue to contribute to skewed research. But the good news is that being mindful of holes in data is at least a preliminary step in correcting them.

Theorist Frequency Graph

Theorist Frequency Graph

In order to make the visualization somewhat manageable, I only counted theorists who had been taught at least twice. That was only 22 out of the 93 theorists, or 24%.

The Early Awkward Family Photo

The Early Awkward Family Photo

Click for better image quality.

Bacon's crest includes... a pig?!

Bacon's crest includes... a pig?!

Found in Caumont de La Force's The Secret History of Burgundy

"I have read this novel, sometimes with the cool eye of a critic, sometimes with the inflamed soul of a lover..." A more impassioned than usual 'To the reader' in Mistakes of the Heart

"I have read this novel, sometimes with the cool eye of a critic, sometimes with the inflamed soul of a lover..." A more impassioned than usual 'To the reader' in Mistakes of the Heart

*The mistakes of the heart: or memoirs of Lady Carolina Pelham and Lady Victoria Nevil. In a series of letters. Published by M. Treyssac de Vergy, counsellor in the parliaments of Paris and Bourdeaux.
*London: printed for J. Murdoch [1769].

The Dublin Print Project

The Dublin Print Project

So I've been uploading my personal project blog-style on Wordpress, and I finished my first post last night. Turns out the internet is more into Dublin reprints than I thought, because three seconds after publishing, I got three hits!! Check out the page and the About sections to find out more about my project: http://thedublinprintproject.wordpress.com

Feeling a little critical?

Feeling a little critical?

Hunt and Clark used this 1768 edition of The memoirs of Capt. John Creichton to prepare their 1827 edition - or, as Hunt and Clark would say, "Captain" John Creichton.